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About History Amir Hamza & Laqa Afrasiyab & the Tilism Magical Beings & Devices
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Mir Ahmed Ali (Lived 1850s)

Mir Ahmed Ali Rampuri was a dastan narrator of Lucknow. He later migrated to the princely state of Rampur to join the court as a dastan narrator in the reign of Navab Muhammad Saeed Khan (1840–55). According to Jah’s statement, it was he who invented the Hoshruba legend that was transcribed by his student, Amba Prasad Rasa, who was also a dastan narrator. This was one of the versions Jah used as his source to create the legend of Tilism-e Hoshruba. No further details are available about his version of the Hoshruba legend except that Muhammad Husain Jah had obtained a copy after a long search.

Mir Ahmed Ali has two unpublished manuscripts to his credit. The first book was in Persian and was co-authored with another Lucknow dastan narrator, Mir Qasim Ali. It was the Qissa-e Amir Hamza and contained the Naushervan Nama, Kochak Bakhtar, Bala Bakhtar, and Iraj Nama. Composed in 1853–54, it had 1,052 manuscript pages and was calligraphed by Navab Ali Khan’s secretary, Ratan Lal. Mir Ahmed Ali’s second book was the Urdu language Tilism-e Tahmuras Deoband. It contained 398 pages, was edited by Amba Prasad Rasa and calligraphed by Ghulam Raza. Mir Ahmed Ali taught dastan narration to Amba Prasad Rasa and Hakim Syed Asghar Ali Khan.

Amba Prasad Rasa (Born: c.1790—Died: 1886)

Amba Prasad (pen name Rasa) was a famous dastan narrator of Lucknow. His father was Chandi Prasad Kayasth. Rasa was the student of Mir Ahmed Ali Rampuri in dastan narration and followed his teacher to the Rampur court in the reign of Navab Muhammad Saeed Khan (1840–55). Rasa converted to Islam in later life and assumed the name of Abdur Rahman. He died in his nineties in 1886. Rasa compiled the two volumes of Kochak Bakhtar in 1853 and the sixth volume of Naushervan-Nama, which he finished late in life. Until recently, it was assumed that, like his teacher Ahmed Ali Rampuri, Rasa did not compose any version of the Hoshruba legend himself. In Jah’s privately published fifth volume, we learn that he did, indeed, transcribe a version of the Hoshruba legend from the notes of Mir Ahmed Ali Rampuri. Jah obtained it after a long search and used it as one of his sources. No other record of this version exists. Rasa’s son, Ghulam Raza, was his student in dastan narration. Ghulam Raza Raza (Lived 1850–1880 or 1888) Ghulam Raza (pen name Raza) was the son of Amba Prasad Rasa. He wrote the Hoshruba legend in the Urdu language in fourteen volumes. The manuscripts of his unpublished works, Tilism-e-Hoshruba-e Batin (4 volumes, 1858–59) and Tilism-e-Batin Hoshruba (10 volumes, 1876–80), are preserved at the Rampur Raza Library. Muhammad Husain Jah had a copy of his version of the Hoshruba legend, which he used as one of his sources for composing his work.

Muhammad Amir Khan (Lived 1850–1880s)

Muhammad Amir Khan was a Lucknow dastan narrator and a contemporary of Muhammad Husain Jah and Ahmed Husain Qamar. According to one account, Khan specialized in writing the episodes about tricksters. He wrote a version of the Hoshruba legend of which the second volume is preserved at the Rampur Raza Library. The total number of volumes he composed is not known. Muhammad Husain Jah had a copy of his version of the Hoshruba legend, which he used as one of his sources for composing his work.

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